Interior Designer Feeds To Scroll Through Forever

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Not to say we’re control freaks, but your home is the one place you can (for the most part) call the shots. That feels especially true in New York City, where the city’s stresses make it even more important to create a haven. No one’s better at doing just that than interior designers. They can take a Pinterest board and turn it into a room, sift through the infinite options of linens and wallpaper and design a home that’s completely you.

So, here are five interior designers with feeds you could scroll through forever. And, for good measure, some do’s and don’ts we’ve picked up from them ourselves.

#interiors #homepolishNYC #interiordesigners

A photo posted by ASHE + LEANDRO (@ashe_leandro) on

@ashe_leandro

Reinaldo Leandro and Ariel Ashe are the go-to design duo for the south-of-14th-street set. Their “tropical modernist” vibe is so sought after, their business is through the (high vaulted ceiling) roof. Their signatures are natural textiles, tiling, tribal artwork and a calming palette. Rei’s own home which you can see on his feed is bonkers. Do: create mini-collections of like objects on end tables, hang rugs on walls. Don’t: block out natural light, go color crazy.

Location: New York, NY

Followers: 17.2k

A photo posted by @elizabeth_roberts_architecture on

@elizabeth_roberts_architecture

If you’re rehabbing a Brooklyn brownstone—casual, you know?—you call Elizabeth Roberts. Under the name Ensemble, she and her team turn crumbling walls and two-family structures into naturally-lit urban palaces that feel at once homey and totally thoughtful. A few hallmarks of the designs: clutter-free spaces, every color of gray possible, and a big focus on any outdoor space (this building-wide door is just gorgeous). Fall in love with this gut renovation. [Stefan voice]: It has everything: artwork of robots, illustrated wallpaper, navy blue tiling, a backyard you’ll never want to leave. Do: mix modern and antique furniture to avoid a cookie-cutter look. And when possible, open shelving. Don’t: mix in too much furniture.

Location: Brooklyn, NY

Followers: 2,437

A photo posted by Jenny Komenda (@jennykomenda) on

@jennykomenda

Jenny runs the super-popular blog Little Green Notebook which launched her design and decorating business. Through her DIY scrappiness and features like “Why Don’t You” ideas, she built quite a following. Fans and clients rely on her for unique ideas like bold color accents, filled-up shelves and a lived-in feel. Do: layer rugs, put a ton of art on the walls. Don’t: be afraid to paint your kitchen cabinets.

Location: New York, NY

Followers: 72.9k

A photo posted by Simplexity Designs (@elisashankle) on

@elisashankle

Elisa’s getting much-deserved attention for her recent makeover of the Man Repeller office, but she’s been giving rooms pattern-heavy, charmingly inclusive vibes for a while now through Home Polish. (She even designed the start-up’s lounge at the annual famous industry fair Sight Unseen Offsite). She’s cemented her status as one of their “destination designers” to hire. Give her a call. Do: revitalize a simple room with great wall or floor tiles. Don’t: keep outside, outside. Instead, bring wicker and rattan indoors.

Location: New York, NY

Followers: 1,703

A photo posted by Søren Rose (@sorenrose) on

@sorenrose

Søren Rose’s warmly sparse interiors recall his Scandinavian upbringing. We love this thought from his site about the studio’s no-hierarchy rule. “If a junior designer has the best idea that’s what we go with.” As a result, each home is a bit different but consistent in the appearance of a lot of natural light wood, plenty of modular wall-mounted shelving (sup, Vitsoe?) and a palette you want to curl up and nap in. Do: design a room around one statement-making light fixture, and keep the rest quiet, Don’t: Overthink it. White, gray, wood, done.

Location: New York, NY

Followers: 5,198


THE GET

The-Get-Workstead-Orbit-Wall-Sconce

An attention-getting Orbit sconce that Elizabeth Roberts counts among her favorites in this week’s Times piece.

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